The E-Type of Your Dreams

The E-Type of Your Dreams

The restoration started for this Fixed Head Coupe as a very gradual process while the car awaited to be snapped up and built into the E-Type of their dreams.

This 1963 E-Type was initially found tucked away in a Kentish barn, a genuine barn-find with relatively solid floors and sills, then treated to rebuilt suspension, brakes, carbs and fuel system and with a sports exhaust added in for good measure, flew through its first MOT. With all work carried out by the experienced E-Type UK restoration technicians. 

Rescued and restored

It was decided this true RHD 1963 example needed a full nut and bolt restoration and E-Type UK would be the professionals to undertake this.

To see what we were working with the E-Type was completely stripped to a bare shell and sent off to the blasters. The fear of every car restorer became apparent: rust had taken over this Series 1 E-Type (the result of being in a barn with no roof for 12 years). Although there was no need to worry as the rust was all removed and the body shop team began the meticulous process of fabricating and fitting new panels in place of where the rust once was. Our Jaguar E-Type restoration team don’t leave any stone unturned and make sure you have the car of your dreams.

It was around this time, in the early stage of the E-Types restoration, the E-Type was purchased as an on-going project, with the client sharing his vision for the 60's classic and E-Type UK tasked to make it a reality. 

The Vision

With the client's vision agreed, E-Type UK set out to put in place the plans to turn this Series 1 into a driving classic with highly desirable upgrades including high torque starter, 5-speed gearbox, electric power steering, uprated shocks and aluminium radiator and header tank. But first, the E-Type needed a solid shell and frame to work from. 

The metal work team continues to work on restoring this Series 1 shell to be a strong and rust free base. Due to years of exposure to the elements, the Series 1 practically needed a whole new shell. While the team were able to repair and reuse some metal work such as the original bulkhead, gearbox tunnel, roof panel and inner and outer rear buttresses, a lot of the shell needed to be fabricated around these existing elements.